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6 Ways to Stay Motivated this Summer

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Summer is finally here! In Canada, we cherish these long-awaited months as they seem to go by faster and faster each year. We can’t wait to spend time outdoors, on the water, or just plain relaxing – or all three! No matter what part of the country you live in, we Canadians love these dog days of summer. And let’s admit it Deacons; you’re also hoping to take a bit of a break right about now.

And yet! Many still have to go to work every day and don’t get us started on the work around the house that needs to get done! Unfortunately (or fortunately!), the church is no different. There are still ministries to run and for Deacons, offerings still need to be collected and counted each week, benevolence work still needs to continue, and planning ahead for the Fall isn’t going to happen on its own!

So, how can your diaconate (and church!) get the rest you need AND stay motivated during these sweet summertime months?

Here are 6 ways:

  1. Stay Plugged In! With routines and schedules turned upside down, it’s easy to spend less time with God. In the summer months, make it a priority to spend even MORE time with Him. Read your Bible, pray and worship God in a rich variety of ways over these next couple months. To some this may sound like more work, or one more thing to do in a season when we are desperate for rest. But remember: “You gain a new excitement for life and your purpose when you are plugged in to Christ.” (Matt Brown) This must be any ministry leader’s first priority. Why not use the online Today devotional to keep you on track!

“You gain a new excitement for life and your purpose when you are plugged in to Christ.”

Matt Brown
  • Take this new season to do some strategic thinking: Summer can be a great time to evaluate your ministry and mission. Does your Diaconate have a vision? How is it going? What goals have you set and reached? Which ones still need to happen? Does your Vision still line up with your church’s? Are the ministries and programs you run still effective and sustainable? Why not spend one evening as a team of deacons to do some reflection and sharing. Here’s one tool to get you started!
  • Learn Something New! Summer time is a great time to focus on leadership development. While attending a conference isn’t always possible, have each deacon read one non-fiction, ministry-related book this summer and share what you learned with your diaconate and church. Sound boring? Do it with your feet up under a big shady tree with a tall glass of ice cold lemonade. Here’s a great one hot off the press, or ask us if you need any other suggestions!
  • Take Your Meetings Outside! Move your deacon’s meetings outdoors or to a different location than the church building. Some churches have even met at a local organization that they support, like their local food bank or a youth drop-in centre. This will not only breathe some life into your meetings but it can be a great way to stay connected to the agencies you support.
  • Catch Up on Your Visits: While many would argue that church members want to be left alone in the summer or that they are too busy for a visit, we guarantee there are many in your church who AREN’T busy and who are even lonelier in the summer. This article from Huffington Post (UK) is quite interesting and eye-opening! Want a more “local” opinion? Here is another one.
  • Plan a Fun Summer Outreach Event! Here in Canada, summer is the IDEAL time to show and share the love of Christ with our neighbours and remind them that God (and His Church) doesn’t take a vacation. Movie nights, free car washes, ice cream socials, and community picnics are all tried and true events that will bring people together and offer gospel moments. And don’t forget to encourage your individual members/families to reach out. Here are some great (non-threatening!) ideas: invite a neighbour or shut-in over for a backyard BBQ, go clean up a neighbourhood park, offer to cut an elderly neighbour’s lawn, water plants for your vacationing neighbours, or offer to babysit for a mom or dad who needs to run a few errands kid-free! And why not have members share about their experiences in September during a morning worship gathering?

So how did we do? Which one are you going to try this week or this month? Let us know in the comments below, share on our Facebook page, or send us a direct message at dmc@crcna.org. Your story could inspire and encourage other deacons and churches.

From “Identity Crisis” to Identity in Christ

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Providence CRC’s Community Opportunity Scan Opens New Doors into the Community

The congregation members and leadership team might not have said it outright, but Providence Christian Reformed Church was experiencing an identity crisis.

The congregation had a 30-year foothold in their Beamsville, ON, community, one of the sleepier spots along the QEW corridor. But, while the church was originally built in a rural setting, surrounded by the orchards and vineyards of the Niagara Greenbelt, it had become more and more of a suburban area.

As a church, Providence had a lot of strengths. “We’re friendly and welcoming to people who are at different stages on their faith journeys,” said Katie Riewald, Director of Community Connections. “We’re unified and responsive when there’s a need or crisis. We have capable and willing young leaders.”

But the problem wasn’t a lack of love for Christ or their neighbours. (When is it ever?) Steve DeBoer, lead pastor at Providence, shared that the church was “in the middle of some congregational changes that were challenging the church, and causing some stress.” One of these was a sudden shift in demographics, with the average age in the church dropping significantly, and a rapid influx of young families. Riewald also adds that there was “a collective lack confidence in how God was using us.” The congregation craved a sense of clarity on how to intentionally engage with their community.

Enter the Community Opportunity Scan.

Community Opportunity Scan? What’s that?

In its simplest form, the Community Opportunity Scan — otherwise known as a COS — is a tool for churches to learn more about the community around them. It’s also a way for members of a congregation to start conversations with their neighbours. Most importantly, though, it’s a program inspired by the love of Christ and the Great Commission — Jesus’ call to make disciples of all nations.

A Community Opportunity Scan is a tool for churches to learn more about the community around them.

Typically, a COS goes through three stages…

  1. Defining your community — Once a team of 5–8 church members is created, your diaconate defines a geographical area that your church wants to get to know.
  2. Gathering information — Doing background research on the assets within a community, and the demographics that make it up, gives your church’s team the context it needs.
  3. Conversations & listening — This is the key piece. Your team interviews members of your community, opens up conversations… and most importantly, listens well.

The whole process is one bathed in prayer and discernment. And it goes beyond identifying needs. It also affirms the unique gifts and assets in your community and your church. The end result shows churches — and their deacons, especially — clear areas to pursue justice and work with community partners.

How the Process Looked for Providence

About 13 years ago, DeBoer attended the Diaconal Ministries’ Annual Day of Encouragement. While there, he learned about the COS process. He wanted to start doing one with Providence, but the timing never felt right.

Things changed when the church made the decision to hire Pastor Mike Collins as a Community Pastor in 2016. One of the main objectives of his job description was to lead the congregation through a COS. “For the COS to be led with integrity, we needed help,” DeBoer recalls. “Having Pastor Mike join us, with the experience he had, gave us confidence to move from talking about it to actually doing it.”

When Pastor Collins came on board, he saw immediately that Providence Church was ready! “I knew the COS was a great tool for any church who desires to realign their compass to face towards local mission opportunities,” he shared. “The COS helped [Providence] focus around that singular cause. It helped to pave the way for building significant community partnerships, identify the potential to transform neighbourhoods and areas within its own church that needed to change. The church grew in its understanding of how God’s Kingdom was forming outside its doors.”

The Results: A Church on Mission with Jesus!

“We have a congregation that is actively learning to lean into what it means to follow Jesus in a missional way.”

Katie Riewald

Ultimately, the end result was a sharpening of Providence’s identity. With clear, tangible ways to engage with their community, they’re no longer in “crisis.” And it’s not just a “win” for the church, either — it’s a win for the community too! “We have a congregation that is actively learning to lean into what it means to follow Jesus in a missional way,” Riewald shared.

More specifically, some of the things that the COS helped Providence identify were:

  • There are lots of services in Beamsville, but most are working in isolation to each other. They found the isolation was detrimental to those who needed access to services. There were gaps, repeated services – and nearly no collaboration at all. This was especially highlighted by the fact that one school they talked to had incredible resources and access to support from the community, but another school, perhaps even more in need, was completely lacking – and they were only a few blocks apart!
  • There are a lot of churches supporting the same causes. Because of this, Providence now limits their key partners. By narrowing their focus, their congregation now has something tangible to engage with. “Once we were able to more clearly demonstrate what we were going to do and why,” said Riewald, “there was high buy-in and enthusiasm from the congregation.” Today, Providence has identified three main causes to support in their community: The Convos Youth Zone, Community Care of West Niagara and the Grimsby Life Centre.
  • There needed to be more coordination for the church’s community involvement. The results of the scan, combined with enthusiasm of the congregation and willingness of partners — as well as the fact that Providence has no team of deacons — resulted in the decision to hire a part-time Director of Community Outreach. This person’s job is to live out the results of the scan, connect with Providence’s key partners, build new relationships and help the congregation love and come alongside their community.

For Providence Church, “the COS was an important part of a larger 2-year Love Lincoln Campaign in pushing us to love our community,” DeBoer shared.

Some Practical Advice on Conducting a COS

Outside of the results, Riewald also shared some more practical tips for churches who are either going through or thinking about starting a scan.

  • Make sure that a comprehensive Communication Plan is in place BEFORE you start, so that the church is engaged in what’s happening. Having clear communication between the team who is interpreting the results and leadership (pastor, elder board, council, deacons, etc.) is essential so that all sides know what the expectations are.
  • Train your volunteers well on how to conduct, record, and transcribe interviews, as well as on how to initiate conversations and explain what the COS is and why it is important. Be sure to lay out your biases, assumptions, and expectations before you start and continually check in so that they do not dominate the discussion.
  • Have someone in place whose job (either volunteer or not) it is to run the scan, and limit the amount of people who have say over interpreting the results.
  • Remember that the COS is a tool – it’s not going to tell your church exactly what to do, but it will help your church start having those discussions. DeBoer reminds churches that “the COS gave us a reason to engage our community leaders—from principals to business leaders to elected officials—providing the start to a conversation we could build on. The kinds of questions the COS had us asking showed them we were thinking beyond our walls, and that we saw them as valuable.”

Dan Galenkamp is a former employee of Diaconal Ministries and we’re excited to have him join our writing team! He is a freelance writer who likes to write about issues of justice and how churches respond to them. He lives with his wife (and two very fluffy cats) in Jordan Station, ON.


Deacon’s – Don’t Go It Alone!

For deacons, when it comes to getting to know your neighbourhood and engaging with your community, it can be difficult to know where to start. For those who have tried outreach — you know how messy it can be to interact with those who have little experience with a church. There’s no clear-cut way to do it.

If you, your diaconal team or your congregation are feeling stuck — or if you’re wondering if your church is having the right impact in your community — going through a Community Opportunity Scan with Diaconal Ministries may be just what you need! Our team has been involved in diaconal work for decades. We understand the awkwardness and messiness that can come with talking to strangers or those on the margins.

Through a COS, you and your church can discern opportunities to…

  • Create awareness of local issues
  • Engage in community partnerships
  • Evaluate existing programs
  • Begin new initiatives

If that sounds like something you’re looking for, get in touch with our team today. We’d be happy to chat with you and your diaconate! You can also visit our website to look at the Key Elements of a COS or take our quiz to determine if your church is ready!

Becoming a Greener Church – Creation Care Series, Part 3

Posted by | Creation Care, Doing Justice, Equipping Deacons, Stewardship, Uncategorized | No Comments

This month we are finishing up our mini-series on Creation Care, which we started in April, partly in celebration of Earth Day. But as we recall from our last post, EVERY DAY IS EARTH DAY, right?! It is our Christian responsibility to care for God’s creation, which not only includes personally in our homes, but also corporately, in our churches and extending that out into our communities and world.

In our last post, we looked at three things to get us started. These can be done personally in our homes, but of course we can also do them together, as God’s people – in our small groups, in our ministry teams, and in our diaconates and councils.

In our first post of this series, I reflected back to my childhood and was delighted to remember the ways my parents showed me how to care for the earth. I’d like to say that my church played a big role in teaching and modeling creation care to me. Thinking back, I couldn’t recall many sermons or youth group study nights or community partnerships that reminded me of the importance of creation care and my role in it. I think one time we may have gone around a plaza behind our church to pick up garbage with the Calvinettes (now called G.E.M.S.)… This is true even as I grew into adulthood and attended a couple different CRCs. Perhaps these things did happen, but I don’t remember them.

So, what is the church’s role in teaching us, reminding us, and animating us, as followers of Jesus, to steward God’s good creation?

Little did I know but Synod (the governing body of the CRCNA) has taken significant action on creation care over the past two decades! Among other things, Synod 2008 approved an updated version of Our World Belongs to God: A Contemporary Testimony in 2008, which reminds us that creation care is of vital importance for the church. It reads as follows:

51. We lament that our abuse of creation has brought lasting damage to the world we have been given: polluting streams and soil, poisoning the air, altering the climate, and damaging the earth. We commit ourselves to honor all God’s creatures and to protect them from abuse and extinction, for our world belongs to God.

What is the church’s role in teaching us, reminding us, and animating us, as followers of Jesus, to steward God’s good creation?

One significant “Call to Action” for the entire denominational body was for churches and its members to “be voices for justice and public examples in the effort to live sustainably within our God-given resources, to promote stewardship in our own communities and our nations, and to seek justice for the poor and vulnerable among us and for future generations.”

This is great! So… whose job is it anyway?

Will All The Deacons Please Stand Up

When we read the Deacon’s Mandate, we see that deacons are called to be “prophetic critics of the waste, injustice, and selfishness in our society, and be sensitive counselors to the victims of such evils.” In all their ministries, deacons are called, “in imitation of Christ’s mercy [to] teach us to love God, our neighbours, and the creation with acts of generous sharing, joyful hospitality, thoughtful care, and wise stewardship of all of God’s gifts.”

Wait, WHAT? It’s the DEACONS job??? Well, yes, for the most part.

Deacons, you don’t have to go it alone. Help is here.

Never Fear! Help is Here!

This is where Diaconal Ministries Canada and other wonderful agencies of the CRCNA come in. Deacons, you don’t have to go it alone. Help is here.

One way that Diaconal Ministries Canada is working diligently to resource and equip deacons is through a brand new partnership with Christian Stewardship Services and the CRCNA in Canada. A Stewardship Pilot Project will be launched in 2019 in order to help the deacons (both ordained and non-ordained) increase their church’s awareness of the Biblical principles of stewardship and help them live those principles out in practical, measurable ways.

Diaconal Ministries is also in the process of signing a Memorandum of Understanding to become an official partner of the Climate Witness Project (CWP). Diaconal Ministries and the CWP will work together with congregations and CWP regional organizers, deacons and staff in order to strengthen their overlapping ministry and enhance each other’s strengths. Communities and churches will be enriched and will respond to God’s call to love their neighbour and care for creation in four key areas: Energy Stewardship, Worship, Education, and Advocacy.

Practical Help for Churches Like Yours

We recently reached out to Andrew Oppong, Justice Mobilization Specialist with the CRC Office of Social Justice, and Dr. Henry Brouwer, professor at Redeemer University, CWP Regional Organizer in Classis Hamilton, and member of Meadowlands CRC in Ancaster, ON. They gave some helpful suggestions and shared resources to help deacons get started! Here are a few:

  1. Perform an Energy and Environmental Audit of Your Church and its Ministries:
    1. How is waste managed at your church? Does your church participate in local recycling and organic programs? Are your staff, ministry teams and groups who rent the church following your guidelines/protocols?
    2. Encourage your Property Management Team to consider ways in which the church building can be made more energy efficient and environmentally-friendly. Do you have bike racks, for example, to encourage cycling to church? Have you upgraded the lighting to more energy-efficient LEDs? If your church is going to be doing a major renovation or new construction, how can the use of fossil fuels be eliminated? See what one church did when they renovated their space! What about installing solar panels? Some churches have considered the use of solar energy as a source of energy production. Save your money and DON’T pave your church parking lot. Say what?! Yep, you heard us. Consider finding alternatives to using road salt in the winter months, which can seep into waterways and impact vegetation along roadways.
  2. Provide Learning Opportunities: Create greater awareness in your own congregation about environmental stewardship:
    1. Cooler/Smarter Series: A 7-part series on the book “Cooler/Smarter” by the Union of Concerned Scientist, which addresses ways in which individuals can reduce their personal carbon emissions. It covers topics from diet, transportation, home heating & cooling to the use of plastics. This is congregationally-led and the OSJ is open to working with churches who may want to start this series;
    2. Budgets and Creation Care: This is a practical guide written by Dr. Henry Brouwer filled with general ways of reducing energy consumption and increasing greater stewardship. Several churches have found this useful in the area of stewardship;
    3. Plan a Worship Service or Series about Creation Care: Some good resources are available on the Climate Witness Project site.
  3. Get Outdoors and Make Your Church Property Green! Be a leading example in your community and show your neighbours that you care about the earth!
    1. Plant a Community Garden: If your church has extra land available, you could make it available for small plots for the community, since many yards are rather small for gardens. It also provides local food and shows people how bountiful the creation can be!
    2. Plant native plants around the property: A butterfly garden can be an attractive addition to the landscaping while at the same time providing a habitat for pollinators (many of which have become scarce).
  4. Be an Advocate!: Contact your local government representatives about your concerns regarding the environment. It is extremely important that we encourage our leaders when they do the right thing and suggest alternatives when they do not. Your voices count!

Churches CAN make a difference! As Voltaire says, “no snowflake in an avalanche ever feels responsible,” yet where would the avalanche be without each snowflake? Check out our section on Creation Care and/or for more inspiration, read some of these success stories posted on the CWP website and don’t forget to download the Ten Ways to Care for Creation guide. Your CWP Regional Organizers are ready and willing to give presentations about Climate Change to your diaconate or church OR help plan and host learning events. They can also help you find local companies or organizations to help you and provide practical tips and ideas.

“No snowflake in an avalanche ever feels responsible.”

Voltaire

Got a Story to Share?

Tell us how you and/or your church are doing your part to care for God’s creation and every living thing in it. Email Erin, our Communications Coordinator – she’d love to hear from you!

Every Day is Earth Day! Creation Care Series, Part 2

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This month we are finishing up our mini-series on Creation Care, which we started in April, partly in celebration of Earth Day. Did you know that the first Earth Day was celebrated on April 22, 1970? Its founder, former Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson, was inspired to create this day of environmental education and awareness after seeing the oil spill off the coast of Santa Barbara in 1969.

When my kids were young, they used to play an online game which began with the phrase, “Every Day is Earth Day!” The game helped young children identify different kinds of garbage and they were asked to place items in the appropriate ‘bin’. While items are being discarded, we see deer frolic, birds fly and fish splash around in the background, reminding kids (and parents!!) that nature doesn’t just belong to them. It’s simple, sweet, and delightfully effective.

While this game may seem fine for little ones, its message is for everyone. Do we behave like everyday is Earth Day – not just April 22nd?

Here at Diaconal Ministries Canada, we truly believe that “the earth is the Lord’s and everything in it.” (Psalm 24:1). Something we, as Diaconal Ministries’ staff, were reminded of in our reading of the book “Earthwise; A Hopeful Guide to Creation Care”, is the importance of moving from awareness to appreciation to stewardship. While this topic can become quite polarizing, we hope we can all agree that creation care matters. The Deacon’s Mandate requires deacons to be “prophetic critics of the waste, injustice, and selfishness in our society, and be sensitive counselors to the victims of such evils… and in all your ministries help us participate in the renewing of all things even as we anticipate its completion when God’s kingdom comes.” They are also called, “in imitation of Christ’s mercy [to] teach us to love God, our neighbours, and the creation with acts of generous sharing, joyful hospitality, thoughtful care, and wise stewardship of all of God’s gifts.”

Do we behave like everyday is Earth Day? 

Why Should We Care About the Environment?

“You are worthy, our Lord and God, to receive glory and honor and power, for you created all things, and by your will they were created and have their being.” Rev. 4:11

In a recent blog post on the Do Justice site, Cindy Verbeek, guest blogger and board member of Diaconal Ministries Canada, shares the following insights from the story of Noah and the Flood, found in Genesis 9:

“Genesis 9:8-17 describes those first moments when Noah and all in the ark with him were free to go into the world after the flood. The earth was refreshed and they were ready to start again.

Here God made his covenant with Noah. In my early days as a Christian, I read it as a covenant between God and all humanity. But it says something much bigger. If you look at this passage with an eye to understand God’s relationship with all creatures you might be surprised to see that God’s covenant is with Noah, his descendants, and every living creature that was with him.

And just in case we didn’t get it the first time, God says it 7 times: every living creature that is with you – the birds, the livestock and all the wild animals…every living creature on earth…every living creature with you…between me and the earth…between me and you and all living creatures of every kind…all living creatures of every kind on the earth…all life on earth.

So I can’t help but wonder – what if we actually believed that? What if every church, every Christian school yard, every piece of property owned by Christians was an oasis not just for our souls and hearts but for our physical world and being as well – for every living creature with us? We are covenant people after all.”

More than Just a Bandwagon

Environmentalism is most definitely not a new thing. Acid rain, oil spills and other prevalent issues seemed to bring things to a head and organizations like World Wildlife Fund and Green Peace were birthed already back in 1961 and 1971 respectively. For Green Peace, “direct action and shocking images” was the first line of defense in protecting the environment and educating the rest of society. And for a time, it proved successful. Growing up in the 80s and 90s, it seemed to me as though all of a sudden everyone cared about the environment and if you didn’t you were ostracized!

It would appear, though, that society’s awareness and care for the environment began to wane over the years. For a time, it seemed we had ‘everything under control’ and we were doing enough to care and protect the environment. Or were we? Nowadays, we hear about climate change, severe weather and another animal going extinct constantly. The alarm has been sounded once again and it would appear we have all hands back on deck. Plastic straws are being banned in municipalities across our country, carbon taxes are being implemented, and everyone seems to be running around with a Swell bottle, don’t they? So these things are helping, right? Or is this just another fad? Have we become a bunch of bandwagon hoppers?

So How Are You Doing Personally?

“The Lord God took the man and put him in the Garden of Eden to work it and take care of it.” Gen. 2:15

Do we, as followers of Jesus, take time to acknowledge and educate ourselves on creation care? Why or why not? How do we read Genesis 2:15 and understand it? What other stories or passages from the Bible speak about Stewardship of the environment, aka Creation Care? Now while I may be abiding by the 4 R’s and becoming more aware and appreciative of our beautifully and wonderfully made world, is there more to being a good earthkeeper than that? Is banning plastic straws enough?

What if every church, every Christian school yard, every piece of property owned by Christians was an oasis not just for our souls and hearts but for our physical world and being as well – for every living creature with us? We are covenant people after all.

Cindy Verbeek

Thankfully for us, many good folks in the CRCNA have put together some ways we can be good earthkeepers. Here are some ways to start today:

  1. Get educated! Check out this article or watch this episode of Context with Lorna Dueck;
  2. Get studying! Here are some books you can read and study alone or in a group, recommended by Office of Social Justice:
    1. Serve God, Save the Planet: A Christian Call to Action Practical, readable how-to guide to changing your lifestyle.
    2. Earthwise: A Guide to Hopeful Creation Care This book, now in its third edition, helps to provide us and our friends, neighbors, coworkers, and fellow citizens with practical information and ideas to become truly “earthwise.”
    3. For the Beauty of the Earth: A Christian Vision for Creation Care A thorough theology of creation care for pastors and lay-leaders.
    4. A Climate for Change: Global Warming Facts for Faith-Based Decisions Authored by a climate scientist and a pastor, this book offers straightforward answers to the many questions about climate change, without the spin.
    5. Living the Good Life on God’s Good Earth A group guide to care-taking through a series of topics: lifestyle, homes, food, clothes, etc.
  3. Get practical! Check out Ten Ways to Care for Creation by Faith Formation Ministries and the Office of Social Justice.

How ‘Bout You, Deacons?

So deacons, are you leading and equipping your churches to be good earthkeepers? How is Creation Care part of your stewardship ministries? In our next article we’ll look at what we as the church, the collective Body of Christ, can do to steward the earth together.

Caring for God’s Creation – Part 1

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Image by YLawrence from Pixabay

Over the past six months, Diaconal Ministries’ staff have read and studied the book “Earthwise; A Guide to Hopeful Creation Care”. Initially when we started this book, I thought to myself; I’m not really sure why we are taking time reading about a topic that we likely know enough about and probably all agree upon anyway. How will this book help us and, in turn, help deacons learn and grow in their ministry? Aren’t we all doing what we can? Don’t we all agree that “the earth is the Lord’s and everything in it” (Psalm 24:1) and that just as Adam was given ‘charge’ or dominion over the earth to take care of it, we are also obeying that commandment the best we can? As followers of Christ, aren’t we all striving to be excellent earthkeepers? As we worked through the book and had some wonderful discussions, many of these musings were (shamefully) silenced and I prayed more than one prayer of gratitude for never voicing these aloud. (Oops, well, I guess I just did!) Much to my surprise, in reading this book (as well as other articles in The Banner, on The Network and the DoJustice blog, and just following the news of today), I was shocked at how polarizing this topic has become! So when we wrapped up our book study last week and went around the table sharing our ‘top learning’ from this book and what we will change in our life as a result of reading this book, my initial responses were, “SO MUCH!” and “EVERYTHING!” respectively.

As followers of Christ, aren’t we all striving to be excellent earthkeepers?

What is Creation Care?

But seriously, it did cause me to pause and think about my life and how I have ‘treated’ and cared for God’s creation. I also thought about my childhood and ways my parents and church modeled creation care to me and my siblings, if at all. So let me share a bit of my story with you:

Growing up, we didn’t have a lot of money. We lived in a modest two-storey home. (I may have called it a shoebox more than once) with my parents and my three sisters (yes, 5 women and 1 guy!). We each had to share a bedroom and one bathroom – we even shared bathwater! When something broke, we fixed it. When we couldn’t fix it, we bought second-hand. If something could be used twice (or thrice!) it certainly was. For example:

  • yogurt containers became an economical addition to our Tupperware cupboard;
  • milk bags (the clear pouches) were our ‘Ziploc baggies’;
  • clothes were hung up on the clothesline outside to dry and handed down from daughter-to-daughter (and repaired and patched as needed);
  • a schoteldoek (Dutch for ‘dishcloth’) was our napkin at dinnertime. (We even travelled with a pre-moistened schoteldoek – in a sealed milk bag of course – as Wet Wipes certainly weren’t even an option!);
  • we had a lovely vegetable garden in our good-sized backyard with the composting bin appropriately placed in the corner, surrounded by killer bees and greedy flies;
  • canning and freezing were just a regular part of our seasonal routine and our fruit cellar was stocked with food – imagine that!

At the time, I figured my parents made these choices out of economic necessity. They had a mortgage and bills to pay, four daughters to put through Christian school, and old cars to maintain. While this was likely part of why they did what they did, I also knew that my mother vehemently opposed wasting a crumb of food – or anything for that matter. She truly knew how to stretch a dollar. Her upbringing has a lot to do with it, she says. But it was also so much more that that. Whether they knew it or not, I had two parents who lived out the 4 R’s: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Repeat.

This, in big and small ways, impacted me. Growing up, I began to appreciate all God had given to me, to us. My ears and eyes began to open. While I may have cursed a few of those awful hand-me-downs and the lukewarm, cloudy bathwater I had to slip into (ew, right?!), I also remember understanding how to be careful with the resources I had and to be less wasteful. One year I even took my own money to protect an acre of the rainforest through the World Wildlife Fund. I wanted to do my part in helping creation and everything in it to survive and thrive!

As I’ve grown, my parent’s example has stayed with me, but, alas, convenience (and laziness??!!) has also slowly crept in. I diligently read and follow our region’s recycling, composting, and garbage regulations. I still try to pick up litter when I see it. I even have a few yogurt containers in my cupboard for leftovers. BUT! I use paper towels AND a schoteldoek. When the boys were young they shared bathwater, but we all take our own showers now. I re-use some milk bags… but also buy Ziploc baggies. I’ve purchased Tupperware AND Gladware. I don’t have a garden in my tiny backyard because my aboveground pool and hot tub take up most of the room. I’ve always meant to install a clothesline outside, but just haven’t gotten around to it and I wouldn’t want pool water splashing onto my clean clothes… Oh, and my fruit cellar? It’s pretty much a storage room – for STUFF – not food. And the list goes on.

While we may be abiding by the 4 R’s and becoming more aware and appreciative of our beautifully and wonderfully made world, is there more to being a good earthkeeper than that?

So How Are We Doing?

Now while I may be abiding by the 4 R’s and becoming more aware and appreciative of our beautifully and wonderfully made world, is there more to being a good earthkeeper than that?

“The Lord God took the man and put him in the Garden of Eden to work it and take care of it.” -Gen. 2:15

“You are worthy, our Lord and God, to receive glory and honor and power, for you created all things, and by your will they were created and have their being.” -Rev. 4:11

Are we “worshipping” and serving created things instead of giving glory and honor to the Creator?

This month the Christian church will celebrate the “Super Bowl” of holidays: Easter! Around the same time, more than 193 countries around the world will celebrate another important holiday: Earth Day. While all Christian churches will celebrate the one, what about the other? Is Earth Day just another gimmicky, “Hallmark” holiday? Are we “worshipping” and serving created things instead of giving glory and honor to the Creator? Are we putting the Earth and its needs before humans and theirs? Are we more concerned with being “politically correct” than we are in proclaiming truth and grace? Are we falling prey to extremism or becoming an alarmist instead of trusting God and His sovereignty over all creation?

Earth Day aside, perhaps the better question to ask ourselves is how are Deacons living into their mandate to “be prophetic critics of the waste, injustice, and selfishness in our society, and be sensitive counselors to the victims of such evils… and in all your ministries help us participate in the renewing of all things even as we anticipate its completion when God’s kingdom comes”? Do deacons see Creation Care as part of their stewardship mandate (Time, Talents, Treasures, AND TREES) and leading and equipping their churches? If, as followers of Jesus, we truly believe that “the earth is the Lord’s and everything in it” (Psalm 24:1), what does that look like lived out in your diaconate, your church, your individual homes, and beyond?

This month let’s talk about some of these hard questions and challenges we face. If you have a story or experience you’d like to share, please contact Erin, our Communications Coordinator – she’d love to hear from you! Over the next couple of weeks, we’ll look at Creation Care in your home and church, in your community, and in our world.

Diaconal Ministries Canada Breaks New Ground!

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NewGround Program Banner

Here at Diaconal Ministries Canada, we believe God is always at work and He calls churches to follow Him into their communities to share Christ’s transformational love with each and every person. Cities and neighbourhoods should be impacted and blessed through the social action and thoughtful, cultural engagement of local Christians. Through its Operation Manna Program, Diaconal Ministries Canada has been helping churches establish vital community ministries across the country for over 35 years. More than 140 local ministries have been started or expanded through an Operation Manna partnership, most of which are still thriving today! Praise God!

Cities and neighbourhoods should be impacted and blessed through the social action and thoughtful, cultural engagement of local Christians.

A wise man once said (okay, it was Walt Disney!): “We keep moving forward, opening new doors, and doing new things, because we’re curious and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.”  So while we celebrate the meaningful impact Operation Manna has had, the conversation regarding changing the name and updating the program’s activities has been going on for over 10 years.

While it has been hard to measure the program’s strength and significance within the general Canadian CRC ‘population’, Diaconal Ministries’ staff and Operation Manna Committee members have looked at the amount of money that was coming in through the yearly offering, the number of churches who were applying to the program, as well as numerous conversations with churches and deacons over the years.

It appeared that some churches and its members were confused about what Operation Manna was, what it did, and/or who it was for, as well as its connection to Diaconal Ministries Canada. Some seemed to still associate Operation Manna with World Renew where it began in the 1960’s and continued until Diaconal Ministries took it over in 2001. (This would explain why a few cheques for Operation Manna are still being sent to World Renew each and every year! I kid you not!). Others believed it was some sort of food program, given its name and history. On top of that, as Tammy Heidbuurt, Program Director, points out: “Diaconal Ministries Canada has had such a great resource to support new ministries [through Operation Manna], but many CRCs still don’t know about it!” (To read a more detailed history, click HERE!)

More recently, the conversation was picked up again as Diaconal Ministries’ staff and the program’s committee were ready to expand the program to help churches love their communities AND build into leaders of today and tomorrow. So in the early Fall of 2018, it was decided that the time had finally arrived to help clarify the purpose of the program and break new ground! We are excited to announce that as of March 1st, 2019, the Operation Manna Program was renamed NewGround.

“NewGround is all about connecting the gifts of our churches and deacon leaders to the ministry opportunities in our cities and local neighbourhoods.” -R. Vroege

The NewGround Program will continue to partner with churches to start or grow local community ministries. Brand new to the program is a Youth Justice Initiative and also Deacon Scholarships. Rachel Vroege, Diaconal Ministries’ Regional Ministry Developer in Western Canada, summarized the revamped program this way: “NewGround is all about connecting the gifts of our churches and deacon leaders to the ministry opportunities in our cities and local neighbourhoods.” Vroege goes on to say that the updated and expanded grant and coaching program will now help reach a new generation of justice seekers and inspire them to get involved in their communities. Heidbuurt agrees and adds that she hopes NewGround will enable churches and its members “to be courageous and creative with ministry opportunities in their community.”

The program will continue to be funded through an annual offering held in CRC’s across Canada, but as the program continues to break ‘new ground’, Diaconal Ministries will be seeking other revenue streams to support its expanded activities.

We hope you will join us in celebrating our updated NewGround Program! Visit our NewGround page or click on the video below to find ways YOU can get involved today.

Is It Making A Difference? – Gateway’s Extreme Weather Shelter, Part 3

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(Pictured above: A pictures taken of outside the shelter. There are no signs, but this “homeless cart” gives evidence of its presence. These carts start to arrive a few hours before the shelter begins some nights. Photo Credit: Monica deRegt)

This is the final article in our 3-part story on the Extreme Weather Shelter opened up by Gateway Church in Abbotsford, British Columbia. Here’s the first article if you missed it – and the second one.


The Extreme Weather Shelter operated by Gateway Church has offered over 160 individuals a dry place to rest this winter. So, is it making a difference? For some guests, like Larry (you can read his story HERE!) the experience has been life-changing. For others, there is no way of knowing what impact, if any, the shelter has made, other than a one-night reprieve from the cold, wet streets of Abbotsford. Is that enough?

The same could be said of the impact on the congregation. There is evidence of community and relationships developing; attitudes are being challenged and sometimes transformed, and deeper conversations are beginning about faith and justice, homelessness, and poverty. But there has also been opposition; people who worry that we are enabling the homeless. Others struggle with the fears and risks that come with opening their building to individuals who may be involved in dangerous and unpredictable activities like drug addiction, violence, and untreated mental illnesses. And some members are concerned that hosting the shelter will negatively impact other outreach efforts. Is it worth it?

The truth that many of the volunteers have discovered is that homelessness – for those who live it and for those who try to help – is a messy journey with no easy answers.

The Shelter’s sleeping area set-up for another night

“It’s not just about Christian love and all of that,” says volunteer Dianne Mulder, in answer to the question of what advice to give to other churches considering hosting a shelter. Mulder and her husband, Al, decided to help out at the shelter to try to find their own answers about why people are homeless. They have learned that the answer is different for everyone, and that a dry place to sleep makes a different impact on each person. Some are more appreciative than others. “It’s not going to solve the problem; it’s just going to help in a small way. It’s brutal and it’s real and you are dealing with people who don’t think like you.”

Houweling believes the shelter is making a difference, not just to the homeless, but to the church as well.

Gord Houweling, who had a cup of coffee thrown in his face the morning after his first night volunteering at the shelter, shares a similar sentiment.  “It is easy to preach ‘turn the other cheek’ but it is difficult to practice when there is absolutely nothing in it for you.”

But Houweling believes the shelter is making a difference, not just to the homeless, but to the church as well, explaining that his own view of the homeless was challenged when he realized he knew the family of one of the guests. “How can this ministry do anything but impact our congregation? Has it changed how we view the marginalized? I would say yes in that at the very least members are talking about it. For those members who have a difficult time accepting this ministry, it is because God is working to help them process how they feel about the marginalized.”

Church members Heather and Aubrey Postma decided to volunteer because they struggled with the hopelessness and frustration of knowing how to help with the enormous problem of homelessness. Both agree that it has been very eye-opening and has changed the way they understand and care about the people living in the homeless camps in their city.

As individuals we aren’t asked to solve all the problems, but we are called to do something to answer the Biblical call to care for the poor and needy.

“As individuals we aren’t asked to solve all the problems, but we are called to do something,” Heather shared, adding that she doesn’t see how anyone could argue against the Biblical call to care for the poor and needy in this way. “Hosting the shelter so that one person stays dry for one night and gets one good night’s sleep is reason enough to participate.”

A BIG thanks to Mrs. Monica Kronemeyer deRegt for writing this 3-part story for Diaconal Ministries Canada.

Monica is a freelance writer and Academic Counselor at Abbotsford Christian School. She lives in Chilliwack, BC, with her husband and three children.


Moving Forward

Through their partnership with BC Housing, as well as with the assistance of several dedicated volunteers, the Extreme Weather Shelter at Gateway Church is here to stay. Each year, the Shelter runs from November 1 to March 31 each year. The criteria used to determine when the Shelter is open is the temperature and weather conditions: 0 degrees or colder (with or without windchill), a posted weather warning (of rain, snow, cold, etc.), and/or if snow is on the ground. If the shelter is opened on a Friday night, it will remain open for the entire weekend (until Monday morning) in order to accommodate the Shelter’s guests. There’s no easy way over the weekend to let guests know if it will be open or not, so leadership at the Shelter feel this is the kindest and simplest way to deal with that issue.

At the end of every season, Lead Pastor Marcel deRegt and Shelter staff take time to evaluate what worked well and what needs improvement for the following year so that they can continue meeting the needs of their guests. While there are members who wonder if the Shelter should be open continuously, from Nov. 1 to March 31, others aren’t sure this is necessary or sustainable, given the amount of volunteers it requires.

Please pray with us for the staff and volunteers of the Shelter as well as the congregation at Gateway Church as they continue to lean on God for wisdom and direction in their pursuit to show Christ’s love and mercy in serving the homeless in their surrounding community.  Pray that grace and understanding abound, both within the givers and those who receive.

Erin Knight, Communications Coordinator for Diaconal Ministries Canada

Surviving Recruitment Time

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It’s the most wonderful time of the year!!!”

Yes, yes, we know Christmas is long gone. It’s Recruitment Time! I am sure by now your Church Council has worked long and hard to craft a witty and concise bulletin announcement and that it’s been published the last 3 weeks, with a deadline that is fast-approaching. And I’m also sure by now your Council Chair’s inbox or church mailslot is overflowing with nominations and/or people asking where they can sign up! If that is true, then this article is NOT for you.

But, if like most churches and Councils, you haven’t heard a peep and/or you’re dreading this year’s nomination process, then feel free to keep reading.

No matter what ministry team you lead in the church, recruitment is likely your least favourite task; aka a ‘necessary evil’. Unfortunately for everyone involved, most church leaders don’t enjoy doing it, not many know HOW to do it, and not many are successful at it. If Recruitment were a musical, it would likely be named I Will Survive and would feature hit songs like:

But seriously, here at DMC, we don’t think it has to be that bad! And we’re here to help! So to help you not only SURVIVE recruiting new deacons, but to THRIVE, we want to spend some time this month looking at the Do’s and Don’ts of Recruitment. This week, we’ll start you off with our Top 10 Ways to Recruit New Council Members. It’s a quick snapshot into how to recruit well, year after year. Look it over, and let us know what you would add or take away, or let us know what you’ve tried in your church.


How About You?

So what does your church or diaconate do to recruit new council members? Tell us your trade secrets! Email Erin today or give her a call at 905-931-1975.

Gateway’s Extreme Weather Shelter – Larry’s Story

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Diaconal Ministries Canada invited guest blogger, Monica deRegt, to write a 3-part story on the Extreme Weather Shelter opened up by Gateway Church in Abbotsford, British Columbia.

While writing the last article, Monica felt led to also share this personal story of her experience in meeting Larry, one of the Shelter’s patrons. You might remember seeing Larry’s picture in Part 1 HERE of this series. Also check out Part 2 by clicking HERE!


Larry was sitting alone at a table in our fellowship hall one Sunday in January, waiting for church to start. On the table in front of him was a single rose wrapped in cellophane. I knew he was one of the guests from the Extreme Weather Shelter we host in our gymnasium. I had met him before; he attends our Sunday morning services regularly. Combatting my inner voice that convinces me I won’t have the right words, I decided to go over, say good morning and talk with him.

Larry enjoying a beverage in Gateway’s gymnasium.

Larry turned out to be quite the conversationalist! He shared part of his story with me, explaining why he struggled to earn enough money at his part-time job to cover rent in our town, and how that was what originally led him to our shelter. He has since made a connection with one of our members who helped him find an affordable place to rent. He then complimented me on my freshly manicured nails and I was immediately ashamed and flattered at the same time: how pretentious and rich I must appear to this man, I thought. And yet, it also surprised me that he would notice and take the time to pay me the compliment. He explained, as if knowing I might be feeling uncomfortable, that one of the things he appreciated about being in our church was being surrounded by men and women who value themselves and take good care of themselves. His past was filled with many people who did not make those choices.

“I’ve met some really good, close friends here. Friends that really care about my health.”

Larry has found community at Gateway, saying that he experienced tremendous support through the shelter, where he felt treated like an equal person. Because of that, he wanted to show his support to the church by coming on Sundays to see what it was all about. He enjoys talking and having coffee with the members who come early before the services.

“I’ve met some really good, close friends here. Friends that really care about my health.”

Larry has become a regular face at Gateway’s community events as well. He participated in the Arts and Crafts Fair, selling prints of his beautiful drawings.

Larry is making a difference in the lives of people at Gateway.

And the rose he had with him? Larry takes a flower to church every Sunday so he can give it to a woman who looks as if she needs to feel appreciated. Larry is making a difference in the lives of people at Gateway.

Thank you Monica for sharing this story with us!